Upcoming Events

Thu Jan 04 @ 6:00PM - 09:00PM
Monthly Meeting

Login Form

Latest Forums Post

  • No posts to display.
solstice.jpg

What is a Rally?

Rallies have traditionally included everything from extremely competitive two person teams to families out for an afternoon drive. There is usually a lunch break at the midpoint, and rallies usually end at a spot where food and beverage is available. Regardless of how competitive you are, rallying is a lot of fun if you like to spend time in your car, see some terrific scenery, and and spend time with congenial people.

Misery Bay's road rallies, or simple rallies, are run on open public roads at or under the legal speed limit. A rally team must consist of at least two people; a driver and a navigator, although more people are allowed per vehicle as long as they can be legally belted in. The amount of competitive effort is decided upon by the teams. Like autocross events, no special equipment is needed to participate in a road rally, but teams will need the following; a watch or clock of some sort to match and keep rally time, a pen and pad, and in the case of night rallies, a flashlight of some other interior light. The concept of a road rally is simple. Each team is given a set of directions to follow. Teams leave the start approximately one minute apart. The first leg of the rally allows teams to calibrate their times and mileage with the rally master's. This is important as you have a specific amount of time to reach an Official Mileage Point, or Check Point. During each rally leg between check points you are given directions and specified travel speeds which will change often. The rally master knows how fast you were supposed to travel and how far you went and calculates an exact time you should arrive at each check point. Official rally times are kept with very accurate clocks and are the official time your trip is held against. Each team is given points at each check point for how early or late they arrived. The difference between the times when you should have arrived and when you actually arrived at a check point becomes your score for the rally. Since the score is separate at each check point, arriving early will not make up for arriving late at the previous check point. 

From the Covered Bridge Rally, 2012

 


At the end of the rally, scores are tallied and then confirmed by rally officials. The lowest score wins, not the highest. Road rallies are a contest of precision, not a race. The team's objective is to reach each check point as close to the official time as possible, and have a lot of fun in the process, and probably win some cool prizes. Regardless of how competitive you are, rallying is a lot of fun if you like to spend time in your car, see some terrific scenery, and and spend time with congenial people.